New York Times Best Sellers

| 0 comments

For the week of April 28, 2013. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. DADDY’S GONE A HUNTING, by Mary Higgins Clark. (Simon & Schuster, $26.99.) Two sisters are threatened by a dark secret from their family’s past.

2. DON’T GO, by Lisa Scottoline. (St. Martin’s, $27.99.) An Army doctor returns from Afghanistan when his wife dies in what at first appears to be an accident, and finds that his life is falling apart.

3. LIFE AFTER LIFE, by Kate Atkinson. (Little, Brown, $27.99.) A woman appears in different versions of the same events, centered on World War II.

4. UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES, by Stuart Woods. (Putnam, $26.95.) The New York lawyer Stone Barrington discovers a shadowy network beneath the world of European wealth.

5. THE BURGESS BOYS, by Elizabeth Strout. (Random House, $26.) Two brothers, both lawyers, come together in a small Maine town to defend their good-for-nothing nephew; by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Olive Kitteridge.

   

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. LEAN IN, by Sheryl Sandberg with Nell Scovell. (Knopf, $24.95.) The chief operating officer of Facebook urges women to pursue their careers without ambivalence.

2. GIVE AND TAKE, by Adam Grant. (Viking, $27.95.) A Wharton professor’s research discloses that success depends on how we interact with others, and he argues that “givers” do better than “takers.”

3. GULP, by Mary Roach. (Norton, $26.95.) A science writer’s pilgrimage down the digestive tract.

4. UNSINKABLE, by Debbie Reynolds and Dorian Hannaway. (Morrow/HarperCollins, $28.99.) A second memoir by the actress, singer and dancer.

5. THE WAY OF THE KNIFE, by Mark Mazzetti. (Penguin Press, $29.95.) The Times’s national security correspondent describes how the lines between the C.I.A. and the American military have been blurred.

    

Young Adult:

1. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

2. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

3. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

4. INSURGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) In this Divergent follow-up, a faction war looms. (Ages 14 and up)

5. LOOKING FOR ALASKA, by John Green. (Penguin Group.) A boy seeking excitement finds that and more in a girl named Alaska. (Ages 14 to 17)

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

2. THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN, by Katherine Applegate. (Harper/HarperCollins.) A gorilla who lives in a mall meets an elephant. (Ages 8 to 12)

3. THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU 1, by Valorie Schaefer. Illustrated by Josee Masse. (American Girl Publishing.) Advice on the changing body for younger girls.  (Ages 8 to 12)

4. THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU 2, by Cara Natterson. Illustrated by Josee Masse. (American Girl Publishing.) Advice to guide girls through the next steps of growing up.  (Ages 9 to 12)

5. TIMMY FAILURE, by Stephan Pastis. (Candlewick.) An 11-year-old runs a detective agency with his business partner, Total, a polar bear. (Ages 8 to 12)

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *.