New York Times Best Sellers

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For the week of April 14, 2013. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. LOVER AT LAST, by J. R. Ward. (New American Library, $27.95.) Book 11 of the Black Dagger Brotherhood series.

2. SIX YEARS, by Harlan Coben. (Dutton, $27.95.) Six years after the woman he loved married another man, Jake Fisher discovers that neither she nor their life together were what they seemed, and he sets out to uncover the truth.

3. THE BURGESS BOYS, by Elizabeth Strout. (Random House, $26.) Two brothers, both lawyers, come together in a small Maine town to defend their good-for-nothing nephew; by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Olive Kitteridge.

4. LEAVING EVERYTHING MOST LOVED, by Jacqueline Winspear. (Harper, $26.99.) In 1933, the private investigator Maisie Dobbs helps an Indian man whose sister’s murder has been ignored by Scotland Yard.

5. GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn. (Crown, $25.) A woman disappears on her fifth anniversary; is her husband a killer?

   

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. LEAN IN, by Sheryl Sandberg with Nell Scovell. (Knopf, $24.95.) The chief operating officer of Facebook urges women to pursue their careers without ambivalence.

2. SALT SUGAR FAT, by Michael Moss. (Random House, $28.) A New York Times reporter reveals how food companies use science to encourage us to consume more of their products.

3. SUM IT UP, by Pat Summitt with Sally Jenkins. (Crown Archetype, $28.) A memoir by the longtime coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols, who received a diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

4. KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

5. MY BELOVED WORLD, by Sonia Sotomayor. (Knopf, $27.95.) The Supreme Court justice recalls growing up in the Bronx, attending Princeton and becoming a federal judge.

 

Young Adult:

1. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

2. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

3. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

4. LOOKING FOR ALASKA, by John Green. (Penguin Group.) A boy seeking excitement finds that and more in a girl named Alaska. (Ages 14 to 17)

5. INSURGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) In this Divergent follow-up, a faction war looms. (Ages 14 and up)

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

2. THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU 2, by Cara Natterson. Illustrated by Josee Masse. (American Girl Publishing.) Advice to guide girls through the next steps of growing up.  (Ages 9 to 12)

3. THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU 1, by Valorie Schaefer. Illustrated by Josee Masse. (American Girl Publishing.) Advice on the changing body for younger girls.  (Ages 8 to 12)

4. THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN, by Katherine Applegate. (Harper/HarperCollins.) A gorilla who lives in a mall meets an elephant. (Ages 8 to 12)

5. TIMMY FAILURE. MISTAKES WERE MADE, by Stephan Pastis. (Candlewick.) An 11-year-old runs a detective agency with his business partner, Total, a polar bear. (Ages 8 to 12)

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