New York Times Best Sellers

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For the week of March 24, 2013. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. FROST BURNED, by Patricia Briggs. (Ace, $26.95.) The shape-shifter Mercy Thompson seeks assistance from an unlikely ally when her mate, the Alpha werewolf Adam Hauptman, and the rest of his pack are abducted.

2. THE STRIKER, by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott. (Putnam, $27.95.) n 1902, the young detective Isaac Bell discovers that provocateurs, not the union members he was hired to investigate, are causing trouble in the coal mines.

3. THE STORYTELLER, by Jodi Picoult. (Emily Bestler/Atria, $28.99.) A New Hampshire baker finds herself in the midst of two Holocaust stories: her grandmother’s story of survival, and the confessions of an elderly German man, an SS officer.

4. ALEX CROSS, RUN, by James Patterson. (Little, Brown, $28.99.) While Alex Cross pursues a Washington serial killer (or killers?), someone is after him.

5. A WEEK IN WINTER, by Maeve Binchy. (Knopf, $26.95.) Guests at an inn by the sea on Ireland’s west coast; the final book by Binchy, who died in 2012.

   

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. SUM IT UP, by Pat Summitt with Sally Jenkins. (Crown Archetype, $28.) A memoir by the longtime coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols, who received a diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

2. SALT SUGAR FAT, by Michael Moss. (Random House, $28.) A New York Times reporter reveals how food companies use science to encourage us to consume more of their products.

3. KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

4. MY BELOVED WORLD, by Sonia Sotomayor. (Knopf, $27.95.) The Supreme Court justice recalls growing up in the Bronx, attending Princeton, working for the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and becoming a federal judge.

5. AMERICAN SNIPER, by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice. (Morrow/HarperCollins, $26.99.) A member of the Navy SEALs discusses his childhood, marriage and battlefield experiences.

  

Young Adult:

1. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

2. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

3. I HUNT KILLERS, by Barry Lyga. (Little, Brown & Company.) A teenager tries to control his own destiny in the face of overwhelming odds. (Ages 15 to 18)

4. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

5. LOOKING FOR ALASKA, by John Green. (Penguin Group.) A boy seeking excitement finds that and more in a girl named Alaska. (Ages 14 to 17)

 

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

2. THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN, by Katherine Applegate. (Harper/HarperCollins.) A gorilla who lives in a mall meets an elephant. (Ages 8 to 12)

3. THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU 2, by Cara Natterson. Illustrated by Josee Masse. (American Girl Publishing.) Advice to guide girls through the next steps of growing up.  (Ages 9 to 12)

4. THE FALSE PRINCE, by Jennifer A. Nielsen. (Scholastic.) Four orphans compete to impersonate a king’s son in a faraway land. (Ages 9 to 12)

5. TIMMY FAILURE. MISTAKES WERE MADE, by Stephan Pastis. (Candlewick.) An 11-year-old runs a detective agency with his business partner, Total, a polar bear. (Ages 8 to 12)

  

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