New York Times Best Sellers

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For the week of March 17, 2013. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. CALCULATED IN DEATH, by J. D. Robb. (Putnam, $27.95.) Lt. Eve Dallas must crunch the numbers as she investigates the death of a successful accountant; by Nora Roberts, writing pseudonymously.

2. THE STORYTELLER, by Jodi Picoult. (Emily Bestler/Atria, $28.99.) A New Hampshire baker finds herself in the midst of two Holocaust stories: her grandmother’s story of survival, and the confessions of an elderly German man, an SS officer.

3. ALEX CROSS, RUN, by James Patterson. (Little, Brown, $28.99.) While Alex Cross pursues a Washington serial killer (or killers?), someone is after him.

4. GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn. (Crown, $25.) A woman disappears on her fifth anniversary; is her husband a killer?

5. A WEEK IN WINTER, by Maeve Binchy. (Knopf, $26.95.) Guests at an inn by the sea on Ireland’s west coast; the final book by Binchy, who died in 2012.

   

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. SALT SUGAR FAT, by Michael Moss. (Random House, $28.) A New York Times reporter reveals how food companies use science to encourage us to consume more of their products.

2. NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer. (Dutton, $26.95.) An account by a former member of the Navy SEALs, written pseudonymously, of the mission that killed bin Laden.

3. AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL, by Ben C. Carson and Candy Carson. (Zondervan, $19.99.) A doctor explores what makes America great.

4. AMERICAN SNIPER, by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice. (Morrow/HarperCollins, $26.99.) A member of the Navy SEALs discusses his childhood, marriage and battlefield experiences.

5. MY BELOVED WORLD, by Sonia Sotomayor. (Knopf, $27.95.) The Supreme Court justice recalls growing up in the Bronx, attending Princeton, working for the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and becoming a federal judge.

  

Young Adult:

1. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

2. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

3. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

4. LOOKING FOR ALASKA, by John Green. (Penguin Group.) A boy seeking excitement finds that and more in a girl named Alaska. (Ages 14 to 17)

5. INSURGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) In this Divergent follow-up, a faction war looms. (Ages 14 and up)

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

2. THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN, by Katherine Applegate. (Harper/HarperCollins.) A gorilla who lives in a mall meets an elephant. (Ages 8 to 12)

3. LEGO NINJAGO CHARACTER ENCYCLOPEDIA, by Claire Sipi. (DK Publishing.) Information about minifigures, vehicles and weapons. (Ages 6 and up)

4. TIMMY FAILURE. MISTAKES WERE MADE, by Stephan Pastis. (Candlewick.) An 11-year-old runs a detective agency with his business partner, Total, a polar bear. (Ages 8 to 12)

5. IN A BLINK, by Kiki Thorpe. Illustrated by Jana Christy. (Random House/Disney.)  A fairy must help four girls find their way home. (Ages 6 to 10)

  

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