New York Times Best Sellers

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For the week of January 20, 2013. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn. (Crown, $25.) A woman disappears on her fifth anniversary; is her husband a killer?

2. EMPIRE AND HONOR, by W. E. B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (Putnam, $27.95.) An O.S.S. agent’s plan to help his German intelligence counterparts reach Argentina encounters trouble; Book 7 of the Honor Bound series.

3. THE RACKETEER, by John Grisham. (Doubleday, $28.95.) Malcolm Bannister, an imprisoned ex-lawyer, knows who murdered a federal judge. And he concocts a scheme to exchange this information for his freedom.

4. THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci. (Grand Central, $27.99.) The military investigator John Puller, the protagonist of Zero Day, probes his aunt’s mysterious death in Florida.

5. THREAT VECTOR, by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney. (Putnam, $28.95.) As China threatens to invade Taiwan, the covert intelligence expert Jack Ryan Jr. aids his father’s administration — but his agency is no longer secret.

   

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

2. THOMAS JEFFERSON, by Jon Meacham. (Random House, $35.) The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist celebrates Jefferson’s skills as a practical politician.

3. THE WORLD UNTIL YESTERDAY, by Jared Diamond. (Viking, $36.) The author of Guns, Germs, and Steel examines what we can learn from traditional societies.

4. NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer. (Dutton, $26.95.) An account by a former member of the Navy SEALs, written pseudonymously, of the mission that killed bin Laden.

5. KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

   

Young Adult:

1. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

2. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

3. MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN, by Ransom Riggs. (Quirk Books.) An island, an abandoned orphanage and a collection of curious photographs. (Ages 12 and up)

4. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

5. INSURGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) In this Divergent follow-up, a faction war looms. (Ages 14 and up)

  

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

2. I FUNNY, by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein.. (Little, Brown & Company.) Jamie Grimm is on a mission to become the world’s greatest stand-up comedian.

3. NANCY CLANCY, SECRET ADMIRER, by Jane O’Connor. Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser. (HarperCollins Publishers.) Nancy and Bree decide to play matchmaker. (Ages 7 to 10)

4. LEGO NINJAGO CHARACTER ENCYCLOPEDIA, by Claire Sipi. (DK, $18.99.) Information about minifigures, vehicles and weapons. (Ages 6 and up)

5. ONE DIRECTION: DARE TO DREAM, by the members of One Direction. (HarperCollins Publishers.) Life as a boy band. (Ages 6 to 12)

 

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