New York Times Best Sellers

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For the week of January 13, 2013. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn. (Crown, $25.) A woman disappears on her fifth anniversary; is her husband a killer?

2. THE RACKETEER, by John Grisham. (Doubleday, $28.95.) Malcolm Bannister, an imprisoned ex-lawyer, knows who murdered a federal judge. And he concocts a scheme to exchange this information for his freedom.

3. MERRY CHRISTMAS, ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson. (Little, Brown, $28.99.) Detective Alex Cross confronts both a hostage situation and a terrorist act at Christmas.

4. THE CASUAL VACANCY, by J. K. Rowling. (Little, Brown, $35.) The sudden death of a parish councilman reveals bitter social divisions in an idyllic English town.

5. THREAT VECTOR, by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney. (Putnam, $28.95.) As China threatens to invade Taiwan, the covert intelligence expert Jack Ryan Jr. aids his father’s administration — but his agency is no longer secret.

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

2. THOMAS JEFFERSON, by Jon Meacham. (Random House, $35.) The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist celebrates Jefferson’s skills as a practical politician.

3. KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

4. NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer. (Dutton, $26.95.) An account by a former member of the Navy SEALs, written pseudonymously, of the mission that killed bin Laden.

5. AMERICA AGAIN, by Stephen Colbert, Richard Dahm, Paul Dinello, Barry Julien, Tom Purcell et al.. (Grand Central, $28.99.) The mock pundit of Comedy Central’s Colbert Report tells how to bring America back from the brink.

Young Adult:

1. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

2. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

3. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

4. INSURGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) In this Divergent follow-up, a faction war looms. (Ages 14 and up)

5. LOOKING FOR ALASKA, by John Green. (Penguin Group.) A boy seeking excitement finds that and more in a girl named Alaska. (Ages 14 to 17)

 

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. I FUNNY, by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein.. (Little, Brown & Company.) Jamie Grimm is on a mission to become the world’s greatest stand-up comedian.

2. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

3. LEGO NINJAGO CHARACTER ENCYCLOPEDIA, by Claire Sipi. (DK, $18.99.) Information about minifigures, vehicles and weapons. (Ages 6 and up)

4. ONE DIRECTION: DARE TO DREAM, by the members of One Direction. (HarperCollins Publishers.) Life as a boy band. (Ages 6 to 12)

5. ‘WHO COULD THAT BE AT THIS HOUR?’, by Lemony Snicket. Illustrated by Seth. (Little, Brown & Company.) Tween Lemony’s secret-society apprenticeship. (Ages 8 to 12)

 

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