New York Times Best Sellers

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For the week of December 16, 2012. View the complete list from The New York Times.

Hardcover Fiction:

1. COLD DAYS, by Jim Butcher. (Roc, $27.95.) Harry Dresden lives, but he’s no longer Chicago’s only professional wizard. Now he’s the Winter Knight, Queen Mab’s assassin, and she wants her newest minion to pull off the impossible: kill an immortal.

2. THE BLACK BOX, by Michael Connelly. (Little, Brown, $27.99.) In a case that spans 20 years, the Los Angeles detective Harry Bosch links the bullet from a recent crime to a file from 1992, the killing of a young female photographer during the race riots.

3. NOTORIOUS NINETEEN, by Janet Evanovich. (Bantam, $28.) The New Jersey bounty hunter Stephanie Plum joins with Joe Morelli to track down a con man who disappeared from a hospital; meanwhile, she takes a second job guarding Ranger.

4. THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci. (Grand Central, $27.99.) The military investigator John Puller, the protagonist of Zero Day, probes his aunt’s mysterious death in Florida.

5. THE RACKETEER, by John Grisham. (Doubleday, $28.95.) Malcolm Bannister, an imprisoned ex-lawyer, knows who murdered a federal judge. And he concocts a scheme to exchange this information for his freedom.

   

Hardcover Nonfiction:

1. KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

2. THOMAS JEFFERSON, by Jon Meacham. (Random House, $35.) The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist celebrates Jefferson’s skills as a practical politician.

3. KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt, $28.) The host of The O’Reilly Factor recounts the events surrounding the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

4. NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer. (Dutton, $26.95.) An account by a former member of the Navy SEALs, written pseudonymously, of the mission that killed bin Laden.

5. AMERICA AGAIN, by Stephen Colbert, Richard Dahm, Paul Dinello, Barry Julien, Tom Purcell et al.. (Grand Central, $28.99.) The mock pundit of Comedy Central’s Colbert Report tells how to bring America back from the brink.

  

Young Adult:

1. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, by Stephen Chbosky. (Simon & Schuster.) What it’s like to grow up, from the perspective of a high school boy. (Ages 14 and up)

2. DIVERGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) A girl must prove her mettle in a faction-ridden dystopia. (Ages 14 and up)

3. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, by John Green. (Dutton, $17.99.) A 16-year-old heroine faces the medical realities of cancer. (Ages 14 and up)

4. INSURGENT, by Veronica Roth. (HarperCollins Publishers.) In this Divergent follow-up, a faction war looms. (Ages 14 and up)

5. THE BOOK THIEF, by Markus Zusak. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A girl saves books from Nazi burning. (Ages 14 and up)

 

Children’s Middle Grade:

1. LEGO NINJAGO CHARACTER ENCYCLOPEDIA, by Claire Sipi. (DK, $18.99.) Information about minifigures, vehicles and weapons. (Ages 6 and up)

2. THE LEGO IDEAS BOOK, by Daniel Lipkowitz. (DK, $24.99.) Tips for taking the brick projects you have and making something new. (Ages 7 and up)

3. LINCOLN’S LAST DAYS, by Bill O’Reilly and Dwight Jon Zimmerman. (Holt, $19.99.) An account of the 16th president’s assassination. (Ages 10 to 15)

4. ONE DIRECTION: DARE TO DREAM, by the members of One Direction. (HarperCollins Publishers.) Life as a boy band. (Ages 6 to 12)

5. WONDER, by R. J. Palacio. (Knopf Doubleday Publishing.) A boy with a facial deformity enters a mainstream school. (Ages 8 to 12)

  

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